Milton Hershey School Alumnus, Staff Member Shares the Impact of Houseparents

By Roger Smith, MHS Class of 1985, Student Program Leader 

I came to Milton Hershey School from Brooklyn, New York as a ninth-grader. I was born in Trinidad and Tobago, and my mother immigrated to New York to pave her way. My siblings and I stayed with our family in Trinidad, so it was a sacrifice for my mother to leave her kids to seek a better opportunity for us. The same thing happened when the opportunity of MHS came along for me—she trusted that MHS and its houseparents would take care of her son. I could tell right off the bat that my houseparents were at MHS to make a difference in students’ lives. And when you feel that as a student, it brings comfort.

Milton Hershey School staff and alumnus Roger Smith shares his story with MHS houseparents

I remember when my houseparents first moved into the student home, we were all watching. They moved in 10 pieces of cooking equipment, so we all knew we were going to eat well. They had such a passion to take care of their kids. They taught me how to cook because that is a lifelong skill. Everything they did was with love.

There are some houseparents at MHS that have known me since I was a student. Houseparents are at the forefront of changing students’ lives. I now try to carry that out in my own role at MHS. I want to be a strong figure that students can look up to just like I looked up to my houseparents when I was a student.

2021 Houseparent Salary Comparison

Like many things that didn’t happen in 2020, the 2020 Salary Comparison was one of them. I am back on track this year and just completed the 2021 salary comparison and it has mostly good results.

The top salary has gone up considerably. The low salary is down $1000, which puts it back to where it was in 2018. The median average is only up slightly, but the mean average is up considerably. Salaries went up in every region except one, and in the regions they are up, they are up considerably. In addition several facilities are giving incentives, both sign-on and longevity bonuses which also raise overall salaries.

In doing the 2021 salary comparison, I went through my database of all job listings posted on The Houseparent Network in the last 12 months.  If a facility had more than one job listing during that time, I kept only the most recent.  I had 115 different facilities that have posted job listings in the past year (A decrease of 33 facilities over 2019).  Of those, 72 facilities posted salaries (6 less than 2019), the rest posted things like competitive or negotiable, etc.  Stuff I couldn’t work with.

Before I give my numbers here is my disclaimer:
Note: Let me start by saying that this is not a scientific sampling based on all the facilities in the country, but I think it is still a close representation of the average salaries throughout the country. All salaries listed are per individual.  If you are paid as a couple multiply these averages by two to compare it to your salary.  Also, many facilities listed a range of salaries, so I also express my averages as a range.  I am also making the assumption that the salary listed by the facility is the cash salary and not total package

I also suspect that the true average is less than what these numbers indicate, because I suspect that many of the facilities that don’t post a salary are in the lower range. However, you can’t just assume that because they don’t list a salary, their salary is low.  When my wife and I considered coming back and accepted a position in 2015, we talked to two other facilities that did NOT list salaries.  They were both in the $50,000 range for couples, the average couples salary at the time was around $46,000.  The position we accepted was actually lower than both those salaries, but was a better fit for our situation.

You also need to remember that when considering a position there are many more considerations than just salary.  You also have to consider benefits, schedule, living accommodations, and the difficulty of the children you are caring for.  If one facility pays a salary of $45,000 per year and also provides full family health insurance, you may be better off than a facility that pays $55,000 and only pays toward your individual insurance.  In our situation, we were paying over $11,000 a year for family health insurance prior to accepting a previous position, we paid less than a $1,500. That is an instant pay raise of over $9,000. A good retirement plan can also add several thousand dollars to a salary each year. Look at the whole package, not just the salary. That said, let’s get to the numbers.

 20212019
Mean average salary for an individual houseparent$28,678 – 30,624 per year$25,113 – 26,263 per year
Median average (half the salaries are less, half are more) salary for an individual houseparent$27,000 per year$25,000 per year
Mean average of top 25% of salaries using the low single salary column for calculating the top 25%$40,499 – 42,638$33,635-34,177
Mean average of top 25% of salaries using the high single salary column for calculating the top 25%$40,013 – 44,097$32,435-35,319
Mean average of bottom 25% of salaries using the low single salary column for calculating the bottom 25%$18,864 – 19,858$17,813-18,563
Mean average of bottom 25% of salaries using the high single salary column for calculating the bottom 25%$19,106 – 19,384$17,697 – 18,224
Region 1: Arkansas, Tennessee, Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana – Mean Average$27,773 – 28,728$23,607 – 24,284
Region 2: Maine, Vermont, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Rhode Island, New York, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, West Virginia- Mean Average$33,207 – 35,513$29,0143 – 32,702
Region 3: Ohio, Michigan, Indiana, Iowa, Illinois, Minnesota, Missouri, North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, Wisconsin- Mean Average$29,102 – 30,540$23,750 – 24,250
Region 4: Washington, Montana, Oregon, Idaho, Wyoming, California, Nevada, Arizona, Utah, Colorado, Alaska, Hawaii – Mean Average$32,635 – 37,548$28,633 – 31,912
Region 5: Texas, Oklahoma, New Mexico – Mean Average$24,257 – 25,100$25,027 – 25,321

 The Top salary is $60,000 which is $15,000 more than 2019 and was for a single houseparent position. The top salary for couples was $100,000 a $10,000 increase over 2019.  The bottom salary is $12,000 per year, which is a $1,000 decrease of the bottom salary in 2019.

Book Review – They Cage The Animals At Night

The true story of an abandoned child’s struggle for emotional survival

By: Jennings Michael Burch

Disclaimer: This book review is my opinion of the book. If you have a different opinion of the book that is great. I know I have loved several movies and books that other reviewers have not liked and disliked movies and books that receive great reviews. I think we all have. If youbook cover would like to submit your own review, I may consider posting it. Thanks.

I can honestly tell you that this book was life changing for me.  I had been a houseparent for over ten years and before I read this book, I was seriously looking for the exit sign.  I was tired; I was frustrated and I was thinking there had to be an easier way to make a living. By the time I was halfway through the book, I didn’t want to put it down and realized there was no other thing I could possibly see myself doing besides caring for the children I care for.

The book is a true story about a child that suddenly finds himself in and out of orphanages, institutions, and fosters homes over about a four year period while his mother was in and out of hospitals battling physical and mental illness.  He has to deal with abandonment as well as a great amount of abuse at the hands of many of those charged with caring for him.  His resilience and strength, as well as the love and influence of a few key individuals, helps him to make it through the ordeal.

This all takes place during the early 1950’s, so the techniques and programs are very different from what you would find today and it makes me thankful I don’t do childcare in the BAD old days.  Reading this book will not give you any new techniques to help you be a better houseparent or childcare worker but it will help you to see the different kinds of people that work caring for children as houseparents and foster parents, and to recognize the kind of person you should want to be.  It did for me.  Though I am convinced that the level of abuse described in this book would never be tolerated today, I believe there are still many of the same kinds of people still doing the work.

The Bad

  • Sister Frances – is a gruff, rough and very direct type of worker.  She is very physical and expects good behavior for convenience (to make her job easier)  She seems to be one those “you have to break-em and then mold-em” kind of people.  She does care about children and at times, shows great compassion but does not appear to respect children.
  • Sister Barbara – appears to not like her work or the children.  She expects perfection from the children to make her job easier.  She rules with fear and is very abusive.
  • Mrs. Abbott – is even more despicable than Sister Barbara.  Not only does she hate her job, rule with fear and abuse children, she also degrades them in such a way that is more damaging than anything physical.

The Good

  • Sister Clair – appears to enjoy her work and working with children.  She is compassionate and respectful to the children.  She is concerned about the problems of the children and takes the time to explain the rules and expectations to the children and why they are needed.
  • Sister Ann Catherine – is much like Sister Clair but more affectionate.

He also lived with three very different sets of foster parents:

  • The Carpenter’s – are the type of foster parents that saw foster care as a business or job.  They are abusive to the children and had no concern for them.  They were only concerned with the money and were pretty good with faking it with social services.
  • The Frazier’s – are the type of foster parents that seemed generally concerned for children.  They felt good about helping a poor disadvantaged child and generally tried to meet his needs.  Though their house staff was very connected, they themselves did not seem to be very emotionally connected to Jennings.
  • The Daly’s – are the type of foster parents that are very concerned with the children.  They are concerned about their emotional as well as their physical needs.  The thing that stands out most about them is that they are willing to make a personal sacrifice to help a child they are caring for.

For those of you that don’t work caring for children, you should know that some of the greatest and most positive influences for Jennings were people he didn’t live with, like:  teachers, a bus driver, a night watchman, policemen, etc.  There were also those that didn’t have such a positive influence on him, like: teachers, social workers, policemen, etc.  You also need to know that things are very different in 2007 than they were in 1952.  We don’t put bars on the windows or barbed wire around the top of the fence to keep children in.  We don’t let one person supervise 30 kids, assign them numbers like prisoners, or make them live in dormitories with 30 or 40 other kids. 

I would recommend this book for any person that works in the foster care system, especially houseparents.  I also think it is a very good to read to get the perspective of a child that has been in the system.  Even though it is dated, I believe most of the children in care today experience many of the same feelings and fears that Jennings did over 50 years ago.  Feelings of loneliness, sorrow, fear, shame, abandonment, and depression are just as painful today as they were back then.  Finally, I also noticed that many of the people that had a positive influence on Jennings were never able to to see the results of their influence.  This is no different than how it is today.  When you are working with disadvantaged children and caring for other people’s children, you may never see the results of your labors.  Being able to see how it has worked for others should help you to keep doing it anyway.

The book is published by Signet, an imprint of New American Library, a division of Penguin Group, Inc., New York, NY.  Copyright 1984.  It is currently only available in paperback, but hardcover copies can be found used on Amazon and other places.  It is 293 pages long. 

Click here for more information about this book at Amazon.com

2019 Houseparent Salary Comparison

I just completed the 2019 salary comparison and it has some mixed results. The top salary has come down some but the bottom salary has gone up. The mean average is only up slightly, but the median average is up considerably. Salaries went up in every region except one, and here in the South they are up considerably. Overall, I would say salaries are up. In addition several facilities are giving incentives, both sign-on and longevity bonuses which also raise overall salaries.


In doing the 2019 salary comparison, I went through my database of all job listings posted on The Houseparent Network in the last 12 months.  If a facility had more than one job listing during that time, I kept only the most recent.  I had 148 different facilities that have posted job listings in the past year (An increase of 15 facilities over last year).  Of those, 78 facilities posted salaries (8 more than last year), the rest posted things like competitive or negotiable, etc.  Stuff I couldn’t work with.


Before I give my numbers here is my disclaimer:
Note: Let me start by saying that this is not a scientific sampling based on all the facilities in the country, but I think it is still a close representation of the average salaries throughout the country. All salaries listed are per individual.  If you are paid as a couple multiply these averages by two to compare it to your salary.  Also, many facilities listed a range of salaries, so I also express my averages as a range.  I am also making the assumption that the salary listed by the facility is the cash salary and not total packageI also suspect that the true average is less than what these numbers indicate, because I suspect that many of the facilities that don’t post a salary are in the lower range. However, you can’t just assume that because they don’t list a salary, their salary is low.  When my wife and I considered coming back and accepted our current position in 2015, we talked to two other facilities that did NOT list salaries.  They were both in the $50,000 range for couples.  The position we accepted was actually lower than both those salaries, but was a better fit for our situation.


You also need to remember that when considering a position there are many more considerations than just salary.  You also have to consider benefits, schedule, living accommodations, and the difficulty of the children you are caring for.  If one facility pays a salary of $45,000 per year and also provides full family health insurance, you will be better off than a facility that pays $55,000 and only pays toward your individual insurance.  In our situation, we were paying over $10,000 a year for family health insurance prior to accepting a previous position, we paid less than a $1,500. That is an instant pay raise of over $9,000. A good retirement plan can also add several thousand dollars to a salary each year. Look at the whole package, not just the salary. That said, let’s get to the numbers.


 

2019

2018

Mean average salary for an individual houseparent

$25,113-26,263 per year

$24,591-26,156 per year

Median average (half the salaries are less, half are more) salary for an individual houseparent

$25,000 per year

$23,660 per year

Mean average of top 25% of salaries using the low single salary column for calculating the top 25%

$33,635-34,177

$33,960-34,932

Mean average of top 25% of salaries using the high single salary column for calculating the top 25%

$32,435-35,319

$32,599-36,738

Mean average of bottom 25% of salaries using the low single salary column for calculating the bottom 25%

$17,813-18,563

$16,927-17,872

Mean average of bottom 25% of salaries using the high single salary column for calculating the bottom 25%

$17,697-18,224

$16,927-17,594

Region 1: Arkansas, Tennessee, Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana Mean Average

$23,607-24,284

$21,789-22,941

Region 2: Maine, Vermont, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Rhode Island, New York, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, West Virginia

$29,0143-32,702

$27,193-30,784

Region 3: Ohio, Michigan, Indiana, Iowa, Illinois, Minnesota, Missouri, North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas

$23,750-24,250

$25,029-25,243

Region 4: Washington, Montana, Oregon, Idaho, Wyoming, California, Nevada, Arizona, Utah, Colorado, Alaska, Hawaii

$28,633-31,912

$27,660-30,199

Region 5: Texas, Oklahoma, New Mexico

$25,027-25,321

$24,663


 The Top salary is $45,000 which is $2500 less than last year.  The bottom salary is $13,000 per year, which is a $1,000 increase over the bottom salary last year.


I now have the information posted in the members only section and it include additional information from the comparison, such as sorted by state, benefits listed in the job listing, as well as all the raw data, minus the facility name.

Book Review – No Such Thing As a Bad Kid!

Understanding and Responding to the Challenging Behavior of Troubled Children and Youth

By: Charles D. Appelstein

Disclaimer: This book review is my opinion of the book. If you have a different opinion of the book that is great. I know I have loved several movies and books that other reviewers have not liked and disliked movies and books that receive great reviews. I think we all have. If you would like to submit your own review, I may consider posting it. Thanks.

This is my new #1 recommended book for houseparents and other residential childcare staff.  This book will help you be a better caregiver after the very first chapter.  It will give you a much better understanding of challenging behavior and the cause.  It will teach you skills to prevent challenging behavior as well as interventions to help you respond to challenging behavior.

The book is divided into three parts.  The first part is titled: “Understanding Challenging Behavior” and includes chapters titled:

  • Misbehavior: A Coded Message
  • Responding versus Reacting
  • Developmental Considerations
  • The Quest for Self-Esteem
  • The Need for Consequences

The second part is titled: “Preventing Challenging Behavior” and includes chapters titled:

  • Asking the Right Questions
  • Troubleshooting in Advance
  • The Power of Humor

The last part is titled: “Responding to Challenging Behavior” and includes chapters titled:

  • The Essence of Communication
  • Basic Verbal Interventions
  • Strategic Verbal Interventions
  • Limit Setting
  • Behavior Modification

For those of you that will read the list of chapters and think this book is all about programs and creating rules, read what he has to say about level systems, “Both sides of the level systems debate raise intriguing issues.  Indeed, abandoning the use of a level system is often risky, signaling the need for a more discretionary approach that may disrupt adult-child relationships.  Yet such personalized encounters lie at the foundation of a good treatment plan.  The objective of out-of-home placements, after all, is to therapeutically replicate events that transpire in the youngsters’ homes rather than artificially construct dynamics that will exist only in a corner of their world.
   Ultimately, our task is not to make the job easier, but to prepare kids for success in less supportive environments – settings devoid of level systems and governed by adult decision-making, some which is bound to be unpopular.”

I absolutely recommend this book for anyone that works with children that have difficult behaviors to include foster parents, teachers, coaches, etc.  If you don’t buy it through Amazon, buy it somewhere or check it out from the library and read it.  It will only make you a better houseparent.

Click here for more information about this book at Amazon.com

2018 Houseparent Salary Comparison

As I was doing this years’ Salary Comparison I was going to declare a slight increase in salaries over last year, however after looking at the data more closely I think the changes are statistically insignificant. Though the mean average is up slightly the median average and high salary is the same. When I compared regions, most averages were down with only one region showing an increase. One thing I did notice more this year was facilities offering other incentives like bonuses and stipends for housing that can affect salaries by thousands of dollars a year. I guess when you consider the other incentives salaries are up for the year.

In doing the 2018 salary comparison, I went through my database of all job listings posted on The Houseparent Network in the last 12 months.  If a facility had more than one job listing during that time, I kept only the most recent.  I had 133 different facilities that have posted job listings in the past year (A decrease of 8 facilities over last year).  Of those, 70 facilities posted salaries (1 less than last year), the rest posted things like competitive or negotiable, etc.  Stuff I couldn’t work with.

Before I give my numbers here is my disclaimer:
Note: Let me start by saying that this is not a scientific sampling based on all the facilities in the country, but I think it is still a close representation of the average salaries throughout the country. All salaries listed are per individual.  If you are paid as a couple multiply these averages by two to compare it to your salary.  Also, many facilities listed a range of salaries, so I also express my averages as a range.  I am also making the assumption that the salary listed by the facility is the cash salary and not total packageI also suspect that the true average is less than what these numbers indicate, because I suspect that many of the facilities that don’t post a salary are in the lower range. However, you can’t just assume that because they don’t list a salary, their salary is low.  When my wife and I considered coming back and accepted our current position in 2015, we talked to two other facilities that did NOT list salaries.  They were both in the $50,000 range for couples.  The position we accepted was actually lower than both those salaries, but was a better fit for our situation.

You also need to remember that when considering a position there are many more considerations than just salary.  You also have to consider benefits, schedule, living accommodations, and the difficulty of the children you are caring for.  If one facility pays a salary of $35,000 per year and also provides full family health insurance, you will be better off than a facility that pays $45,000 and only pays toward your individual insurance.  In our situation, we were paying over $10,000 a year for family health insurance prior to accepting our current position, we now pay less than a $1,000. That is an instant pay raise of over $9,000. A good retirement plan can also add several thousand dollars to a salary each year. Look at the whole package, not just the salary. That said, let’s get to the numbers.

2018

2017

Mean average salary for an individual houseparent $24,591-26,156 per year $24,175-25,297 per year
Median average (half the salaries are less, half are more) salary for an individual houseparent $23,660 per year $23,660 per year
Mean average of top 25% of salaries using the low single salary column for calculating the top 25% $33,960-34,932 $33,831-34,408
Mean average of top 25% of salaries using the high single salary column for calculating the top 25% $32,599-36,738 $32,907-32,295
Mean average of bottom 25% of salaries using the low single salary column for calculating the bottom 25% $16,927-17,872 $16,820-17,550
Mean average of bottom 25% of salaries using the high single salary column for calculating the bottom 25% $16,927-17,594 $16,835-17,374
Region 1: Arkansas, Tennessee, Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana Mean Average $21,789-22,941 $22,335-23,835
Region 2: Maine, Vermont, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Rhode Island, New York, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, West Virginia $27,193-30,784 $29,566-32,010
Region 3: Ohio, Michigan, Indiana, Iowa, Illinois, Minnesota, Missouri, North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas $25,029-25,243 $28,119-29,249
Region 4: Washington, Montana, Oregon, Idaho, Wyoming, California, Nevada, Arizona, Utah, Colorado, Alaska, Hawaii $27,660-30,199 $25,296-26,296
Region 5: Texas, Oklahoma, New Mexico $24,663 $25,026

The Top salary is $47,500 which is the same as 2017.  The bottom salary is $12,000 per year, which is $2,000 increase over the bottom salary last year.

I now have the information posted in the members only section and it include additional information from the comparison, such as sorted by state, benefits listed in the job listing, as well as all the raw data, minus the facility name.

French ToWaffles

I have experimented in the past with cooking French Toast in the Waffle Iron, with success.  Today’s experiment was very different.  I wanted to see if I could make a french toast batter that I could cook in any waffle iron, round or square.  I was very satisfied with the results. The benefit that I see to making the French ToWaffle Batter is that you can basically use any bread in your recipe whether it be sliced, buns, loaf or even dinner rolls and it can be cooked in any shaped waffle iron.  I was telling a fellow staff member about using my waffle iron to make french toast and she said she couldn’t because she had a round iron.  This method solves that problem.

The main ingredient in these French Twaffles were some very stale hamburger buns I had on hand. I first made the custard using 4 eggs, about a cup of milk, about 1 tsp of Vanilla, a little bit of stevia sweetener, and about 1 tsp of cinnamon.  After mixing the custard together, I broke up the bag of stale hamburger buns into small pieces and added them to the bowl.  The batter was still a little runny so I ended up breaking 4 slices of regular bread into the bowl and when it was all stirred together it appeared to be what I thought was the right consistency.

After preheating the iron, I sprayed a little cooking spray onto the surface and spooned a couple of spoon fulls onto the iron, closed the lid and waited for the ready light to come on.

After opening the lid I was very pleased to see that my ToWaffle was nice and fluffy, was very nicely browned, and according to the kids was delicious.  Turned out to be a great way to turn stale bread into a delicious breakfast and also helped keep my grocery budget in check.

Next time I will make a larger batch and use my large 4 slice waffle iron to cook them.

Book Review – PAIN, NORMALITY and the STRUGGLE for CONGRUENCE

By: James P. Anglin

Disclaimer: This book review is my opinion of the book. If you have a different opinion of the book that is great. I know I have loved several movies and books that other reviewers have not liked and disliked movies and books that receive great reviews. I think we all have. If you would like to submit your own review, I may consider posting it. Thanks.

If you are an administrator at a facility or looking to open a new facility this would be an excellent book to read.  It is basically a summary of a 14 month study the author did of well functioning and not so well functioning group homes in British Columbia, Canada.  Though you may consider texts from outside the US irrelevant to our system, you will be very surprised at how similar the conditions, philosophies, practices are to our system in the US.  Additionally the conditions that make for a well functioning program or facility are universal regardless of where the program is located.

If you are a houseparent looking for a text to help you be a better residential childcare worker, there are probably several others that are better suited for that purpose.  This book is more directed for program managers and supervisors to help them create a program that works toward what is best for the youth in care.

He points out that the program is going to be a reflection of director good or bad all the way down to the children in care and uses his research to make his point.  I can concur that in my experience with several programs that I have worked for or been associated with, that is true.  He also shows how staff training or lack there of has a serious effect on how the youth in care are viewed and treated.  And how the programs with better trained staff were usually more effective at caring for and helping the children.  He also uses his research to show that there is a very definite need for group homes in an era when many people are trying to close them down.

Chapter topics include:

  • Historical and contemporary issues in residential care for children and youth.
  • The staffed group home study; research method and implementation.
  • A theoretical framework for understanding group home life and work
  • Congruence in service of the children’s best interest; the central theme of group home life and work
  • Creating and extrafamilial living environment: the overall task of a group home
  • Responding to pain and pain-based behavior; the major challenge for staff
  • Developing a sense of normality; the primary goal for residents
  • Through the lens of the theoretical framework;  a review of selected residential child and youth care literature
  • Implications for new directions in child and youth care policy development, education, practice, and research.

Though the book provides valuable information, I must tell you that it is not easy reading.  You have to have a desire for the information to want to keep reading.  Additionally, to grasp much of the information you might need to be very above average in intelligence or education, there were several times I had to read and re-read to understand what he was saying or to get the point of the topic.  A few times he completely lost me and some words I just blew off, because I didn’t want to do the research to figure out what they meant. 

My favorite quote from the book is: “There is nothing like poor practice to put good practice into perspective.”  I think we all can relate to this on some level, and the author does a good job of comparing the two. 

This book has a copyright of 2002 so it is one of handful of current writings about residential childcare. Of course it is now 2020 so go figure, I originally wrote this review in 2007.

Click here to buy PAIN, NORMALITY and the STRUGGLE for CONGRUENCE from Amazon.com.

No Such Thing as a Bad Kid

The original version of this book was one of the books I recommended to all houseparents.  I can only imagine that the revised version is that much better.  I am in the process of reading this version and hope to have a review posted for it very soon. However, based on his previous version and other books, I am fairly certain this book will be more than worth the purchase price.

No Such Thing as a Bad Kid

Understanding and Responding to Kids with Emotional and Behavioral Challenges Using a Positive, Strength-Based Approach 

Revised and Updated Edition

by Charles D. Appelstein, MSW

Order Now!

Purchase now, and prior to the books release date, and receive a 15% discount, free shipping, signed copies if desired, and reduced rates for quantity discounts.

Bonus:  Order 25 or more and receive a free copy of our “Power of a  Strength-Based Approach” DVD ($195 value)

We anticipate that the book will be available to the public early in September. It is in the final stages of production.

We accept checks, PO orders, and all major credit cards. School districts or state agencies that purchase with a PO will not be required to pay until the books are received.

Download Preorder Form

Ordering information is also located at www.charliea.com and facebook.com/charlietraining.

Contact Charlie at charlieap@comcast.net   or 877 766-4487

A Great Free Scanning App

It is almost everyday that as a Houseparent you need to scan something and now there is finally an option that is free and from what I have been able to tell so far works great.

Adobe has recently released a new app that is available on both iOS and Android devices. It is called Adobe Scan and used in conjunction with the free Adobe Reader app you can create, edit, mark up and sign documents.  The only downside that I can find is that you are limited to storing the documents on Adobe Cloud.  You can’t save them to your OneDrive or Dropbox, but for the price that is a feature I can overlook,

Here is a link for more information about Adobe Scan: https://acrobat.adobe.com/us/en/acrobat/mobile-app/scan-documents.html